OurCounty envisions a future where all residents throughout the region benefit from flourishing, pollution-free natural and built environments, regardless of race, gender, sexual orientation, income, or other social differences. Los Angeles has a well-documented history of exclusionary zoning, racial covenants, and other unjust policies that burden low-income communities and communities of color with conditions such as polluted stormwater runoff, dirty air, and lack of access to parks and open space. Rectifying these inequities is essential to a sustainable future.

Percentage of Days Exceeding State 8-hours Ozone Standard by Receptor Area

  • Over the past 13 years, ozone exceedances have fluctuated from year-to-year across LA County. 
  • East San Gabriel Valley and East San Fernando Valley have had the greatest increases in Ozone exceedances from 2005-2013 
The following sub-regions had less than 3% of days exceeding the State 8-Hours Ozone Standard and were therefore excluded from the above figure: Northwest Coastal LA County, Southwest Coastal LA County, South Coastal LA County 1 and 3 and South Central LA County.

Percentage of Samples Exceeding State 24-hour PM10 Standard

  • Drier, arid inland areas of LA County have higher exceedances.
  • Both PM10 and PM2.5 exceedances decreased from 2008-2010. 
  • Data unavailable for Northwest Coastal LA County, West San Fernando Valley, Pomona/Walnut Valley, South San Gabriel Valley and South Central LA County.
Data unavailable for Northwest Coastal LA County, West San Fernando Valley, Pomona/Walnut Valley, South San Gabriel Valley and South Central LA County.

Percentage of Samples Exceeding Federal 24-hour PM2.5 Standard

  • Drier, arid inland areas of LA County have higher exceedances. 
  • Both PM10 and PM2.5 exceedances decreased from 2008-2010. 
Data unavailable for Northwest Coastal LA County, Southwest Coastal LA County 2, South Coastal LA County 3, East San Gabriel Valley 2, Pomona/Walnut Valley, Santa Clarita Valley and Lancaster - Division St.

Stationary Source Metal Emissions (2005-2017)

  • The amounts (mass) of point source and fugitive air emissions for a number of metals (copper, lead, nickel, chromium, and antimony) all decreased markedly around 2008-2009. Nickel and copper emissions began increasing again around 2015-2016.
  • The mass of manganese and manganese compounds emitted in 2014 was revised due to an error in TRI data for the year (originally reported ~46,000 pounds of point source and fugitive air emissions).
  • Antimony and selenium emissions decreased after 2008 and have not rebounded since.
  • The most prolific emitters of lead are concentrated in south LA County near the Port of Los Angeles. The Tesoro Wilmington Calciner is the single most prolific emitter on the mainland (93.8 pounds). The Navy also reported emitting 97.8 pounds of lead off the coast of San Clemente Island.
  • Lockheed Martin is the most prolific producer of chromium air emissions in LA County.

MATES IV Cancer Risk per One Million Residents with Census Tracts in the bottom 10% Median Household Income (2012-2013)

  • MATES does not provide information about cancer risk from air pollution in the Antelope Valley.
  • Areas with the lowest calculated risk are in the Sandberg/ Gorman area, and on Catalina Island.
  • The areas with the highest calculated risk are near the Port of LA and Port of Long Beach.
  • MATES IV found average air toxics risk decrease of 65% relative to MATES III (conducted 2004-2006).
  • Lower income areas typically have medium to high risk of cancer.

Percent of Total Regional Housing Needs Assessment Allocation Built by Jurisdiction Aggregated across all Income Levels (2018)

Jurisdictions in LA County have completed 35% of the overall housing production required by RHNA. The completion percentage varies by income level:
o    12% for Very Low Income
o    13% for Low Income
o    4% for Moderate Income and
o    68% for Above Moderate Income
In the unincorporated areas, the County has completed 14% of the targeted production of affordable housing under the 5th RHNA cycle:
o    7.4% of Very Low Income
o    2.3% of Low Income
o    0.0% of Moderate Income and
o    28.5% of Above Moderate Income
The percent of total RHNA allocation completed varies across jurisdictions.

Overall, the greatest completion rate is occurring for above moderate income levels


Income Inequality

  • The Gini Index for LA County, and thus income inequality, increased by 3.9% from 2006 to 2017, from 0.484 to 0.5029.
  • From 2006 – 2017, LA County had a Gini Index that was consistently greater than that of the United States, the state of California, and San Diego County. During the same period, LA County consistently had a lower Gini Index than City of Los Angeles and San Francisco County.
  • The Gini Index for all of the selected geographies increased over this period, with a slight decrease only in 2010.
  • Note: a decrease in inequality could indicate that lower income residents have been pushed out.

Income, Poverty, and Living Wage

  • In 2017, 17% of the county population was below the federal poverty level. African Americans, Native Americans and Alaskan, and Hispanics of any race had poverty levels greater than the county average. All White, White non-Hispanics, Asians, and Pacific Islanders had a lower rate of poverty than the overall county.
  • Poverty rates were greatest in the South Central and Northwest areas of the county.
  • Between 41-58% percent of households in LA County made less than a living wage in 2017.
  • Census tracts with median incomes below the living wage were concentrated in the South Central and Northwest areas of the county.

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Percent of Population below Federal Poverty Level by Census Tract (2017)

Median Income by Census Tract: above and below living wage (2017)

Urban Tree Canopy (2014)

  • Tree canopy is greater in wealthy residential areas and lower in poorer/ disadvantaged areas.
  • Approximately 20% of urban LA County is covered by tree canopy (2014 data).
  • Approximately 16% of non-urban LA County is covered by tree canopy.

Population Impacted by Primary MCL Violations in LA County (2012 - 2017)

The population served by systems with MCL violations was significantly higher in 2012 (74,931 people) and 2017 (61,641 people) than for the intervening years (when it ranged between 3,850 and 2,909), due to larger water systems having violations in those years only. In 2012, the City of Beverly Hills and the El Monte City Water Department had violations; in 2017, the City of La Verne Water Division and California State Polytechnic University – Pomona had violations.