The buildings and infrastructure of both yesterday and tomorrow will utilize more efficient technologies and practices that reduce resource use, improve health, and increase resilience. 
The County will protect low-income communities and communities of color from pollution, reduce health and economic inequities, and support more resilient and inclusive communities

Coastal Vulnerability Planning for Sea Level Rise

  • Fourteen entities – 12 cities, the Unincorporated Areas of LA County, and the category of “Federal Lands and Ports” – have jurisdiction along the LA County coastline. Of these, only nine have certified Local Coastal Programs in place.
  • The majority of LCPs were established pre-2000, and to date, none have been fully updated to account for potential impacts of sea level rise.
  • Seven entities have conducted vulnerability assessments, and one entity has a vulnerability assessment currently in progress.

GHG Inventory (2015) Total

The 2015 Greenhouse Gas Inventory collected regional data for some of the sectors. This inventory should not be used in place of a more detailed inventory that a jurisdiction may have performed. Please review the methodology to review the sources of information.


Total LA County Annual Energy Consumption

LA County Building Electricity by Sector by City (2015)

LA County Building Natural Gas by Sector by City (2015)

Distributed Energy Sources by City (MW) (2017-2018)

  • LA County had a total of 894 MW installed distributed generation capacity as of 2018.
  • Annual installations had increased nearly every year from 2009 until 2016, after which there was a drop. Installations in 2018 are lower than in 2015

Cooling Centers in Los Angeles County

  • There are 267 cooling centers total; 256 are south of Santa Clarita.
  • There are only 8 county cooling centers north of Acton.


Number of Heat Stress Emergency Department Visits

  • Total heat stress ED visits are trending upwards, from under 300 ED visits in 2005, to approximately 700 ED visits in 2014. 
  • Total heat stress ED visits per 100,000 increased approximately 2.5 times from 2005 to 2014.

Annual Heat Stress ED Visits per 100,000 Residents by SPA in LA County (2010-2014)

The Antelope Valley had the greatest number of heat stress ED visits per 100,000 residents between 2010 and 2014.

MATES IV Cancer Risk per One Million Residents with Census Tracts in the bottom 10% Median Household Income (2012-2013)

  • MATES does not provide information about cancer risk from air pollution in the Antelope Valley.
  • Areas with the lowest calculated risk are in the Sandberg/ Gorman area, and on Catalina Island.
  • The areas with the highest calculated risk are near the Port of LA and Port of Long Beach.
  • MATES IV found average air toxics risk decrease of 65% relative to MATES III (conducted 2004-2006).
  • Lower income areas typically have medium to high risk of cancer.

Percent Local Water

  • Just under 1.5 million acre-feet of water was supplied to LA County in 2017. This is close to half a million acre-feet less than in the year 2000. 
  • In 2017, approximately 59% of the water used in LA County was sourced from outside the region. This breaks down as: 33% from MWD service water and 26% from the LAA. While the percentage of water sourced from outside the region was similar in 2016 and 2017 (55% and 59%, respectively), the percentage of water provided through the LAA increased by from 6% in 2016 to 26% in 2017, while the percentage from MWD imports decreased from 49% in 2016 to 33% in 2017. 
  • Groundwater resources provided 32% of total Countywide demand, and local recycled water contributed 9%. Together, these sources provided 41% of the total supply. However, because the MWD category “groundwater” includes both runoff from local watersheds as well as an unspecified amount of imported water used for groundwater replenishment, it is not currently possible to accurately answer the question of how much of LA County’s supply is truly local.

Per Capita Water Consumption

  • Between 2000 and 2017, there was a decrease of over 27% in total countywide water demand. 
  • More recently, there was a 12% decrease in total countywide demand between 2013 and 2017, from 163 to 143 gallons per capita per day (GPCD). 
  • Both potable consumptive demand and total MI demand increased between 2016 and 2017, by 3-4%; however, total demand remained below the 2016 level.

Number and Volume of Sewage Spills to Water

  • In 2017 there were 302 reported sewage spills, of which 92 (31%) reached waterbodies. This represented almost 600,000 gallons of sewage spilled in total, with approximately 380,000 gallons (65%) of that volume reaching waterbodies.
  • Within the period reviewed, 2013 had the highest total number of spills that reached a waterbody; however, the number of major spills has progressively increased from 4 in 2013 to 12 in 2017. 



  • The volume of sewage reaching waterbodies in 2017 was less than 2015 and 2016, but higher than 2013 and 2014. 
  • The peak in volume of sewage spills reaching water in 2016 was primarily due to one very large spill of 2.6 million gallons, of which 1.7 million gallons entered storm drains leading to the Los Angeles River

Number and Volume of Sewage Spills to Water

  • In 2017 there were 302 reported sewage spills, of which 92 (31%) reached waterbodies. This represented almost 600,000 gallons of sewage spilled in total, with approximately 380,000 gallons (65%) of that volume reaching waterbodies.
  • Within the period reviewed, 2013 had the highest total number of spills that reached a waterbody; however, the number of major spills has progressively increased from 4 in 2013 to 12 in 2017.